Specialty Pieces

The Rider Designed 1983

This is a one of a kind piece that was never sold to the public before the mold was destroyed. The sword was originally damaged and fixed by Mr. Riccio before giving me the piece, at the Paradise City Art Fair in Northampton Massachusetts.

One of Mr. Riccio’s Special Projects

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Folk Festival 

(can be hung or worn)

One of Mr. Riccio’s special projects

Mr. Riccio was commissioned in 2010 to design
a wearable bell for the 49th annual  Philadelphia Folk Festival.

This music festival is an annual gathering of
musicians and enthusiasts which dates back to 1962.
It a great experience worth looking into.

The bell would be wearable and made in bronze.
I based the design on the festivals long standing logo.

It is a smiling face with the feel of a hand made
woodcut as you might find in folk art.
Sometimes it is a radiant sun.
Often it is depicted on a banjo.

The round character to the logo was
perfect for a bell shape. I also wanted to
include the banjo image in the design, but
not as a handle.
The solution was to include the banjo as a
separate image which would form the front of a bail
for attaching a hanging chord.

I did a lot of experiments with scale and positioning.
The logo image itself proved difficult to translate into
a very small metal ornament.
It took many hours to distill the image to its
essential forms and carve then by hand on the wax model.

For the back of the bell I inscribed the term widely used
by the regular festival aficionados”Folk Fest”.

The model shown here is the first prototype.
I refined the visuals further and adjusted for harmonics
in the final edition.

The clapper or “stone” that roles around in the bell
is another tiny face inside the bell.

He was also commissioned  in 2011 to do the 50th Folk Fest Bell.

 

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Pandora Box

 (Date  Unknown)

( 100 made)

Man was made in the image of the gods by the Titan Prometheus. A zealous mentor, Prometheus kept men free of sorrow.. He gathered hurtful woes and sealed them in a vessel which was left  in the care of his brother Epimetheus. Prometheus did not stop there, he stole fire from the gods and gave it to man. Angered by this Zeus made the first woman, Pandora, and offered her to Epimetheus, who foolishly accepted the gift.

It was not long before Pandora began her mischief, when against her husbands warnings she opened the forbidden vessel, letting vile contents escape. Avarice and Vanity, Malice,Pestilence and Evil itself all flew out buzzing about her. Frightened, she closed the lid, only to prevent the tempering spirit Hope from passing to the aid of man.

Hope, a most determined quality, did not succumb, but forced its way through the lid as does a flower through soil. And to this day it is Hope that sustains mankind against all woeful burdens.

Story told by Mr. Riccio Himself.

We have two pandora boxes with two different tops. The box on the left (our first ) has a rose on top and the one on the right (newest) has an orchid. That is the only different on the tops the rest of the detail on the tops are identical.

There are two different versions for the pestilence charm. One has legs on it and the other does not.

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When making the sword for the pandora box Riccio made three different versions. The three are pictured above and the one in the middle is the final design he chose.

 

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Avatar Designed 2015 

(can be hung or worn)

Designed for the 2015 Fantasy Fest and only 950 made. This is number 187.

Interesting facts about The Avatar:

Each pendant is approximately 50mm in size (about the size of a silver dollar) and is cast from 10 different pieces
The medallion contains an internal bell, which produces sound with both a male and female face featuring eyes that float
A trident clapper produces a musical voice inviting good karma
The Avatar includes both a wearable pendant and a beautiful Bronze display stand.

Once the 950th medallion is sold, the mold will be destroyed and there will no longer be availability.

 

Cosmic Box designed 1992

Story behind it…Since first awareness, Humankind has sought to understand the Cosmic order.
This vessel is inspired of that yearning. It deals with universal images and fundamental concepts.
The concept of the cycle is a benchmark in all philosophies.
The sun and moon have come to symbolize the primary earth cycle.
There are many celestial cycles that are also considered of mystical importance.
Duality is another basic property of all things: (Day and Night, good and evil, life and death, male and female…).
This is the nemeses of the mortal soul, pulled in both directions on every issue. Time is the third conceptual enigma.
It takes on different properties from every perspective and is simultaneous for all.
The Cosmic Box refers to these three ideas through the use of images and form.
Diametric symbols lie back to back and side by side. Life and death lie on the perimeter.
The ram and the fish have a long heritage in religious history.
The owl is a recurrent mystic in Native American and Greek mythology.
It sees where others cannot and is associated with celestial thinking and spiritual wisdom.
The dragon is a universal creature with mythical kinship.
The circular chamber of the box rests upon five pillars, three sectors, and a central orb.
The core depicts the firmament itself; where matter, energy, and spirit gather and spin the cycle of genesis.

Story from Dan Riccio himself

 

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Christmas Set

The picture bellow shows the two different designs for the snowman he made. The one on the left is the old design and the one on the right is the redesign.

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Gargoyle 

(Date Unknown)

(Story Currently Unknown)

Gargoyles are traditionally thought to be created during the medieval period, but examples have been found in ancient civilizations as well. Gargoyles were placed on the roofs of Egyptian temples where their mouths served as a spout for water. Similar pieces were also seen on Greek temples, though the figures were often carved into the shape of lions and other ferocious animals. The name gargoyle is often attributed to St. Romanus, or Romain. According to legend, he saved his country from a monster by the name of Goji, sometimes called Gargouille. Supposedly the monster was so scary looking that it frightened off evil spirits. This led to some calling the monster a protector and placing similar carved pieces on churches and other important buildings.  The Tower of London in England is surrounded by gargoyles, all bearing different grimaces.

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Thimble Letter Designed 1993

Mr. Riccio designed this thimble for The Thimble Collection Club for there 20th anniversary. Sadly the club disbanded shortly after he made this and the thimble now can no longer be made.

This was given to us from Dan Riccio’s personal collection.

 

Girl on Carousel Horse 

(can be hung or worn)

(Date Unknown).

This piece is especially unique, he took a carousel horse he had already made and painted it at  special request for a customer.

Story from Dan Riccio Himself.

Tribal Doll Medallion Designed in 1993

(Story Currently Unknown)

(can be hung or worn)

This is one of Mr. Riccio’s earlier smaller medallion pieces. He ended up not liking the design a did not produce many before the wax mold was destroyed.

Above information from Dan Riccio himself.

 

Oink Designed 1986

It was designed for the Atlanta Georgia Annual Art Festival. Each year they feature one artist to do a specialty design for the festival and in 1986 he was the one chosen.

The design is also based off a pervious design he did in 1985 for a pull toy design. It is almost completely identical to the one we have shown in the picture except the date is feature on the bottom underside of the pig and its 1985.

Story from Dan Riccio himself.

 

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IMG_3612Toy Box

 (Exact Dates Unknown)

He made many versions of this toy box, these are two of the boxes. The toys and the wood for the boxes vary. The boxes made with the lighter wood were done by one of Mr. Riccio’s friends. Who after a career change  he no longer was able to produce the boxes for Mr. Riccio . In the picture above the darker wood boxes were done by Mr. Riccio himself. He stopped making the toy boxes about 20 years ago and now only makes the individual micros and no longer does the box sets. Not only does the wood vary on the boxes but the toy designs can vary. Also he made the toy set in bronze, silver and brass.

Story from Dan Riccio Himself.

 

Jack In The Box  Designed 1982, Redesigned in 1993

(can be hung or worn)

Very early version of this piece. The Jack in the box has had various landscape changes on the surfaces, and much later a new right hand with his own toy. This piece was purchased directly from Dan Riccio at the opening of his exhibit at the New Britain ( Connecticut ) Museum of American Art.

The one on the right is the first version of this piece and the one on the left is the redesign with one of many landscapes on it.

 

Wishing Box Designed 1985

The Wishing Box is a keeping place. It is a sanctuary for your hopes and dreams in the form of a box.
It’s facade is carved in relief to depict the fantasies of childhood; the enchanted cottage,
living toys, creatures of legend, a secret garden and the ocean depths. The lid is a door.
It has many handles, one of which is for people.The inner sanctum is softly it by the outer world through peek holes.
It is a bastion of innocence with a single faithful sentinel, a teddy bear. In your box a frog to become a prince.

It is first of many versions.

Story from Dan Riccio Himself.

 

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Sweetheart Box Designed in 1988, Redesigned in 1989-2000

(Key is able to be hung or worn)

Its a treasure chest of romance. It is layered in sentiment and depicts the many facets of being in love. The basic design reflects the style of rT nouveau; a slender profile, flowing curves and woven shapes, all of which ripple with emotion. Crowning the lid, roses and forget-me-nots are thoughtful gestures of courtship. Under the lid, two hearts nestle together in a bed of ivy, a symbol of longevity. The inner floor of the box shimmers with delicate flowers, soft breezes and doves. A scene represents that mystical euphoric sensation which overrides reason. The underside is primal. It is laced with anatomical motifs which work their way up the back and mesh symbolically with the lid. On front an orchid displays its sensuality. The box contains only one item. It is a delicate key for a special heart. The crown is a pair of concentric hearts and LOVE is spelled in its teeth.

There are three versions, we have the first version from 1988 and the redesign from 2000

 

American Carousel Designed 1992 

(can be hung or worn)

The term carousel is derived from Italian and Spanish words for little war, reference its origin as contests of horsemanship. In America the merry-go-round as a commercial entity was pioneered by Gustav A. Dentzel  in 1839. Early models were often powered by men or horses, and later steam engines.

The Riccio Carousel is a tribute to all Carousels. In the center of this miniature is a replica if the first American made steam boiler used by the C.W.F. Dare Co. of Brooklyn, in 1878. The band organ besides it is one of the many styles of Wurlitzer. These organs were discontinued in 1928. Horses can be fixed, as is the lead horse here, or gallopers which move up and down. Animals other than horses are known as menagerie.

The Swan is stationary seat known as a chariot. The entire surface of these machines are often lavishly decorated with paintings and carvings. American carousels traditionally spin counter-clockwise. These wondrous devices of fantasy and rococo are a part of the creative spirit within us.

We were told by Dan Riccio himself while we purchased the piece, that he originally designed the piece for the curator of the Smithsonian.

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Wizard 

(Date Unknown)

(Story Currently Unknown)

Wizard

Wizard is an enchanter, enchantress, mage, magician, sorcerer, sorceress, warlock, witch, or wizard, is someone who uses or practices magic derived from supernatural or occult sources.[2]:54 Magicians are common figures in works of fantasy, such as fantasy literature and role-playing games, and enjoy a rich history in mythology, legends, fiction, and folklore.